Now that you’ve worked out the financial aspect of this equation, it’s time to find out what kind of car you want to purchase. You’ll need to prioritize your needs and needs for a vehicle, and then look at the different types of cars that suit your needs. Then you’re going to have to shop around to find the car that’s best suited.

Identifying desires and wishes

You’ve already got an idea of what sort of car you can buy. So that’s going to help limit the field right off the bat. Yet there are still already a wide range of vehicles available to meet the target.

So now is the time to decide what you really need in a vehicle, and then a few things you might want.

I ‘m going to use my family as an example. We ‘re really planning a car shop in the next six to twelve months. Here’s what we do need:

A car that will last for at least five years

Sufficient seats for six or more people – enough for our family plus two or more.

Decent gas mileage in the city – because my husband is in our city for his job.

There just isn’t a lot on our list of needs. But there’s a lot on our list of needs, including:

  • External sliding screen
  • Back-seat heating and ventilation regulated separately
  • Leather upholstery-because children
  • MP3 and cell phone charging jacks
  • Build-in under-seat room
  • A trunk of decent quality

And our five-year-old would love to have TV screens in his back.

I would also like to see a limo-style roll-up window for children and adults. Still, unfortunately, I think the odds are slim.

So what do your needs and want the list to look like? Chances are it’s going to be arranged a little like ours. You ‘re going to get a few things you really need from a car, but a lot of stuff you ‘d like to have.

Do your research, please

Now that you know what you’re looking for and what you expect from a car, consider a few makes and models that would fit you. The bigger the quest, the easier it would be to shop for a vehicle.

You want to look at a variety of different topics while you’re studying, including:

  • The mileage you can expect from the make / model in your price range.
  • The actual five-year cost of owning the vehicle, which you can find here.
  • Public reviews for the car
  • Data about how long the car is going to run
  • General availability of the vehicle in your price range and in your area

It’s important not just to choose a make and a model that seems to have what you need and fit your budget. This is especially true if you buy used vehicles and want to own them for another five years or more. In this case, do your due diligence to ensure that your vehicle lasts long enough to meet your needs.

A Continuation: Money Money Money Part V